The Biobased and Renewable Products Advocacy Group (BRAG) helps members develop and bring to market their innovative biobased and renewable chemical products through insightful policy and regulatory advocacy. BRAG is managed by B&C® Consortia Management, L.L.C., an affiliate of Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

By Kathleen M. Roberts

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is hosting an Algae Cultivation for Carbon Capture and Utilization Workshop on May 23-24, 2017, in Orlando, Florida.  The event will feature facilitated discussions focused on gathering stakeholder input on innovative technologies and business strategies for growing algae on waste carbon dioxide (CO2) resources.  Stakeholders will be encouraged to consider challenges and opportunities related to:

                               
■  Sourcing CO2, including quality, quantity, siting, and transport considerations; 
 
■  Cultivating algae, including biomass productivity, efficiency in CO2 utilization, and carbon balances in end products; and
 
■  Finding sustainable “win-win” solutions to reducing CO2 emissions while finding cost savings.


Workshop discussion will help inform DOE strategies to realize affordable, scalable, and sustainable production biofuels and bioproducts made from algae.  Registration is available online.


 

On February 27, 2017, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) announced the publication of the Biorefinery Optimization Workshop Summary Report.  The report provides an overview of the discussion on industry challenges and opportunities that took place during the October 2016 Biorefinery Optimization Workshop in Chicago, Illinois.  The workshop, which comprised a combination of presentations and breakout sessions, focused on feedstock and materials handling; process scale-up, intensification, and cost reduction; and co-product and waste stream monetization.  Discussions from the breakout sessions include key findings on best practices, lessons learned, challenges, potential solutions, and resources needed to overcome current challenges.


 
On February 21, 2017, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) announced the launch of its Chemical Catalysis for Bioenergy Consortium (ChemCatBio), a research and development consortium focused on overcoming catalysis challenges for biomass conversion processes.  The consortium, which consists of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and five other DOE national laboratories, aims to accelerate the development of catalysts and related technologies to bring new catalytic materials to commercial bioenergy applications at least two times faster and at half the cost.  The unique properties of biomass, such as high oxygen content, high moisture content, and high acidity, make developing catalysts for bioenergy applications a challenge.  Through computational modeling, and materials synthesis and characterization capabilities, researchers involved with the consortium have already designed new multi-functional catalysts that enable carbon-efficient conversion and reduce costs by more than $0.5/gallon.

 

On January 13, 2017, the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), together with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), announced the intent to issue a request for applications (RFA) titled “Fiscal Year 17 Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI).”  Projects funded through BRDI must address one of the foll owing topic areas:
 



 
Feedstocks development :  Research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) focused on feedstocks and feedstock logistics as it relates to the production of raw materials for conversion to biofuels and biobased products;
 



 
Biofuels and biobased products development :  RD&D focused on the development of cost-effective, innovative technologies for the use of cellulosic biomass in the production of biofuels, bioenergy, and biobased products, and product diversification to increase the feasibility of fuel production in a biorefinery; and
 

 
Biofuels development analysis :  Optimization of performance and quantification of the project’s impact on sustainability using systems evaluation methods.
 
The full RFA is expected to be posted on the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) Exchange in February 2017, with the full notice of intent currently available.

 

On August 1, 2016, DOE released a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for $7 million to research fuel and engine co-optimization technologies. Funding will be provided through the Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines (Co-Optima) initiative, a collaboration between DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), bringing together national laboratories and industry to conduct tandem fuel and engine research, development, and deployment assessments. This initiative works to improve near-term conventional spark-ignition engine efficiency and enable full operability of advanced compression ignition engines. Research cycles include identifying fuel candidates, understanding their characteristics, and determining market transformation requirements. This FOA is restricted to U.S. Institutions of Higher Education and nonprofit research institutions operating under U.S. Institutions of Higher Education. Proposals should address one or more of the following sub-topics:

  • Fuel characterization and fuel property prediction;
     
  • Kinetic measurement and mechanism development;
     
  • Emissions and environmental impact analysis;
     
  • Impact of fuel chemistry and fuel properties on particulate emissions;
     
  • Small-volume, high-throughput fuel testing; and
     
  • Additional barriers.

Concept papers are due by August 15, 2016, at 5:00 p.m. (EDT), with full applications due on September 18, 2016, at 5:00 p.m. (EDT).

Tags: DOE, BETO, FOA, Biofuel

 

On May 16, 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced that up to $10 million in funding is being given to six projects that are creating innovative solutions to advance bioenergy development. The work will support the Bioenergy Technologies Office's (BETO) goal of developing non-food biomass competitive biofuels with reduced technical investment risks. The selected projects are:

  • Arizona State University, a project engineering cyanobacteria to produce ethyl laurate;
     
  • Arizona State University, a project developing heat-tolerant mixtrophic algae that can consume both carbon dioxide (CO2) and cellulosic sugars;
     
  • Duke University, a project to reduce construction costs for commercial scale biorefineries by making smaller reactors more productive;
     
  • Lygos Inc., a project to develop microbial catalysts to produce renewable aspartic acid from cellulosic sugars;
     
  • White Dogs Labs, a project to develop metabolic pathways to increase the yield of acetone from microorganisms; and
     
  • LanzaTech Inc., a project to manufacture acetone from biobased syngas.

 

On May 16, 2016, the DOE's BETO invited applications for abstracts for the poster session of the ninth annual conference Bioenergy 2016: Mobilizing the Bioeconomy through Innovation. Poster abstracts are due by June 3, 2016, and must fit the following guidelines:

  • Not exceed the maximum of 300 words;
     
  • Explain validity and technical merit of the approach;
     
  • Discuss how the poster will be used to engage Bioenergy 2016 attendees;
     
  • Highlight applicability to BETO activities/Bioenergy 2016 theme; and
     
  • Provide clarity of motivation, methods, results, and conclusions.

Abstracts should be submitted to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) with "Bioenergy 2016 Poster Application" in the subject line. The submission e-mail should also include the poster title, name and affiliation of author(s), curriculum vitae for principal author(s), and the interactive element of the poster. BETO will notify submitters of inclusion in the poster session by June 17, 2016.


 

On April 15, 2016, DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) announced a Notice of Intent (NOI) to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Project Definition for Pilot and Demonstration Scale Manufacturing of Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biopower (PD2B3)." The FOA would be managed by the Bioenergy Technologies Office, and will support technology development plans for drop-in hydrocarbon biofuels, bioproducts, or biopower manufacturing. Applicants should address a topic within the following priority areas:

  • Pilot-scale production of biofuels from high impact cellulosic, algal, or biogas feedstocks;
     
  • Demonstration-scale production of biofuels from high impact cellulosic, algal, or biogas feedstocks; and
     
  • Production of biopower, bioproducts, and biofuels from biosolids and other waste streams.

The full FOA is expected to be posted on the EERE Exchange on May 2, 2016, with the full NOI currently available.


 

On March 28, 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) announced the 2016 update of the BETO Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP). The MYPP helps BETO coordinate its activities and details BETO's activities in the coming years. The latest MYPP includes three major changes:

  • A revised vision statement, "Developing and demonstrating transformative and revolutionary bioenergy technologies for a sustainable nation," to emphasize the role of BETO in the bioeconomy.
     
  • The renaming of the "Algal Feedstocks Research and Development" program area to "Advanced Algal Systems Research and Development," reflecting a stronger focus on the algal biofuels' supply chain and new technical targets for the Algae Farm Design Case.
     
  • An updated Demonstration and Market Transformation section with new milestones for the integrated biorefinery strategy.

 

BETO's Thermochemical Feedstock Interface Project is presenting a Field-to-Fleet project webinar. The event will include a discussion of the project, its outcomes, and opportunities for partnership. Over the course of the multi year project, researchers have discovered how feedstock type affects various thermochemical biofuels conversion processes and quantified impacts of feedstock type on the hydrotreatment of pyrolysis oil, and how the methodology can be applied to other thermochemical conversion pathways. The webinar will be held on Wednesday, April 20, 2016, from 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. (EDT). Registration is available online.


 
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